FAMOUS ANIMAL GRAVE TOUR – An Ode to Our Furry Friends

FAMOUS ANIMAL GRAVE TOUR – An Ode to Our Furry Friends


Welcome to Hollywood Graveyard, where we
set out to remember and celebrate the lives of those who lived to entertain us,
by visiting their final resting places. Not all stars are human. Some of our
favorite on-screen heroes walk on all fours, have fur, and never speak a word.
So if your favorite stars are of the animal variety, stay tuned,
this one’s for you. From our very first episode animals have
played a fun supporting role in Hollywood Graveyard. Cawing crows opened
our first episode, and the famous Forest Lawn deer closed it out. Since then we
met Ryan and Emma Gosling at Inglewood – probably full grown geese by now. Turtles
at Holy Cross; koi swimming at Rose Hills; coyotes at Eden, Rose Hills, and Grand View. There was a cat at Trinity in New York, and even a lawn mowing donkey and a fox
in London. And remember little Captain Jack Sparrow
at Pacific View, who built a nest in a flower pot in a mausoleum?
I wonder how he’s doing. But the cemetery was perhaps the most
eclectic collection of wildlife roaming the grounds has got to be Hollywood
Forever: ducks, geese, swans, turtles, fish, and those iconic peacocks all
intermingle with the dead. Hollywood Forever is also home to dozens
of feral cats. Most of the Hollywood Forever cats are quite skittish, but if
you take Karie Bible’s walking tour of the cemetery there’s a chance you’ll
meet one of the rising stars of Hollywood Forever animals, a black cat
named Close Up – so named by Karie as he can often be seen lounging on Cecil B
DeMille tomb, ready for his close-up. A true Hollywood cat. Perhaps someday he’ll
wander next door onto the Paramount lot and be discovered, as was the cat
in The Godfather, whose role was improvised on the spot when Francis Ford
Coppola found him roaming the lot. Today animals graduate from their supporting
role in Hollywood graveyard and become the stars. Names like Lassie and Toto
ring as familiar in our hearts and minds as do the name’s Marilyn Monroe and
Clark Gable. Not only will we be visiting famous animals but also famous pets – the
cherished companions of our favorite entertainers. So here’s to our beloved
animal friends… they entertain us, love us unconditionally, give us companionship in
life, and watch over us after they’re gone. Or watch over us after we’re gone. Alter Ego, an intimate and trusted friend.
We begin our tour in Paris, France, at the Cimetiere des Chiens. This domestic animal
cemetery opened in 1899 along the banks of the Seine River and is believed to be
the first and finest animal necropolis of the modern era. In our exploration of
animal actors through the ages we begin with one of Hollywood’s very first
four-legged superstars: Rin-Tin-Tin, who we find resting here. He was a male German
Shepherd that became an international star during the silent era.
Rinty, as he was affectionately known, was discovered as a puppy in a bombed-out
kennel in France during World War I by an American serviceman named Lee Duncan.
His mom and siblings were starving, on the brink of death. The squadron saved
the dogs, and Duncan brought two of the puppies back home with him to California
but only Rinty survived. Inspired after seeing the success of another famous
film dog, Strongheart, Duncan was convinced Rin Tin Tin could
be a star performer. He got his first break in 1922’s The Man from Hell’s
River, alongside Wallace Beery. Not long after that Rin Tin Tin would be the
headlining star of his own films – over two dozen of them, becoming one of the
biggest stars of the 20s and 30s on two or four legs. Not only did Rin Tin Tin save many of his
human on-screen counterparts, He’s also credited for saving a struggling little film studio called
Warner Bros. After his death in 1932 Duncan
originally buried him in a bronze casket on his property, but later arranged to
have Rinty returned to his home of origin and buried here in the pet
cemetery. The inscription on his tombstone translates as:
“The great movie star.” From gay Paris, to Tinseltown – we’re back
again in Hollywood at Hollywood Forever Cemetery. Our next animal star is one
we’ve visited a couple times already, but certainly no video about famous animal
actors would be complete without a visit to Toto, a Cairn Terrier. Her original name
was Terry, but officially changed to Toto after her best-known role as Dorothy’s
faithful companion on her journey through Oz in the 1939 adaptation of The
Wizard of Oz. “Toto… I have a feeling we’re
not in Kansas anymore. We must be over the
rainbow!” Toto could be seen in around 20 other
films as well, including Bright Eyes with Shirley Temple, Bad Little Angel, and The
Buccaneer. She lived and was trained on her owner’s ranch in Studio City
Carl Spitz’s Hollywood Dog Training School. When little Toto died in 1945 at
age 11, the family buried her on their property. When the Ventura Freeway came
through the area the Spitz ranch moved to North Hollywood but the construction
of the freeway would destroy Toto’s resting place. This is the approximate
location of the Spitz Ranch and Toto’s resting place in Studio City where
Whitsett and the 101 meet. In 2010 a campaign was undertaken by fans and
historians to have this permanent monument to Toto placed here at
Hollywood Forever, which was dedicated in 2011. Toto’s owner and trainer, Carl Spitz,
was a pioneer in early Hollywood dog training, developing a method of silent
hand signals to direct the animal actors. He owned and trained other animal actors
for films including Call of the Wild. After his death in 1976 he was laid to
rest here in the Iris Columbarium in the Great Mausoleum of Forest Lawn
Glendale. When thinking of legendary cinema canines like
Rin Tin Tin and Toto, another four-legged star quickly
springs to mind: a brave and loyal collie named
Lassie. We’re at Valhalla Cemetery in North
Hollywood, next to the mausoleum of eternal love. Here we find the grave of
Lassie owner and trainer, Rudd Weatherwax. In 1940 a young collie named Pal was
brought to Weatherwax to break his habit of chasing motorcycles. He was unable to
break the young pup, so instead of payment owed, Weatherwax was
given Pal to keep. In 1943 MGM began work on
Lassie Come Home, hiring their own in-house
Collies. But when the dog cast as Lassie struggled in river scene, Weatherwax
and Pal were called and confidently stepped in, impressing the director who
was quoted as saying, “Pal swam, in but Lassie swam out.” From then on Pal was Lassie,
even reshooting all the earlier scenes with the other dog. “Lassie is the story
of a dog and a boy. Oh it isn’t a pretentious picture or an epic; it is too
real, too human, too beautiful for high-sounding adjectives.” Following his debut
Pal starred in six additional Lassie films, which were immensely popular, as
well as a TV pilot, making him the most recognized animal actor of the era. Pal
retired in 1954 and died in 1958 at the age of eighteen. Weatherwax was
devastated at the loss of his beloved companion, laying him to rest in a
special place on the family ranch north of here in Sand Canyon, visiting the
grave often throughout his life. Rudd Weatherwax would train all subsequent
Lassies, particularly on the popular TV series which ran for 19 seasons. He also
helped train a terrier named Skippy who would star as Asta in the Thin Man
films of the 1930s. Rudd was the uncle of Ken Weatherwax who played Pugsley on the
Addams Family, and rests nearby in the adjacent mausoleum. Rudd often worked with
his brother Frank in training animal stars like Asta and Lassie. We find his
final resting place in the Acacia section of Forest Lawn Glendale. Frank
trained a lop-eared yellow mastador named Spike, better known as Old Yeller
from the 1957 film of the same name. Spike would appear in other films like
The Silent Call, and shows like the Mickey Mouse Club.
Spike died in 1962 at the age of 10 and was also laid to rest on the Weatherwax
ranch grounds. During the Golden Age of film and
television three names dominated the trained animal actor scene:
Spitz, Weatherwax, and Inn. We’re at Forest Lawn Hollywood
Hills now in the Tenderness section, where we find the grave of a number of
animal stars with their owner and trainer, Frank Inn. Early in his career Inn
assisted the Weatherwax brothers in training stars like Lassie and Asta. He
then began working as an independent trainer training and handling some of
the big animal stars of the 50s through the 70s. He kept the ashes of many of his
beloved animals after they died and it was his wish that they be buried with
him after his death. And so they were, their urns placed into his casket before
interment. Among the biggest animal stars the rest here with Inn include one of the
best-known dog actors of the 60s and 70s, Higgins, better known as Benji. Higgins also played the dog on Petticoat
Junction. He died in 1975 at age 17. Also here is Orangey the cat, from
Breakfast at Tiffany’s. “Is he alright?” “Sure, he’s okay. Aren’t you, cat? Poor ol’ cat. Poor slob. Poor slob without a name.” He has a number of other
credits to his name, including Rhubarb,
and The Beverly Hillbillies. He was the only cat to win two PATSY Awards, which
stand for performing animal television star of the year – the animal equivalent
of the Oscars. One of the more unique animals that Frank Inn worked with was
Arnold Ziffel, the highly intelligent pig from Green Acres. “What does he want?” “He wants to know if you’ll buy
him some jellybeans.” “Why should I buy him any
jellybeans?” “Oink oink oink.” “He says because you’re rich,
rich, rich.” Arnold also won a number of
Patsy Awards, in fact over his career Frank and his animals would pull in
some 40 plus Patsy Awards. From the glitz and glamor of Los Angeles to a quiet
rural farm in eastern Oklahoma… we’re in Tahlequah on the Snodgrass farm.
This is where television’s most famous talking horse is laid to rest.
Mister Ed was a Palomino horse whose real name was Bamboo Harvester. Mister Ed
premiered on television in 1961 and ran for six seasons. “Hello I’m Mister Ed.” Bamboo Harvester retired
from Hollywood after the show ended in 1966, and died a few
years later. There are conflicting accounts of the beloved horse’s final
years and death, some of the confusion stemming from the
use of a second horse as a stand-in who was also unofficially known as Mister Ed.
After Mister Ed died he was laid to rest here on the Snodgrass farm, with this
monument to the beloved horse dedicated in 1990. May his memory live long. As for the voice of Mister Ed? Well that was B-Western actor Allan “Rocky” Lane, buried
here at Inglewood Park Cemetery. In Western cinema oft times the cowboy
hero’s horse sidekick became as big a star as the cowboy himself. The Lone
Ranger had Silver, Roy Rogers and Dale Evans had Trigger and Buttermilk, and
William S Hart had Fritz the horse. We’re at the William S Hart Park in
Santa Clarita, a monument to Hollywood’s western heritage and one of its very
first cowboy stars: William S Hart. He was the preeminent Western star of the
early silent film era known for his rugged portrayal of the cowboy hero
imbued with honor and integrity. This 265-acre Newhall area ranch was Hart’s home,
which he bequeathed to LA County after his death, for the benefit of the public.
On these grounds is where Hart laid to rest his beloved sidekick and on-screen
co-star Fritz the horse. Fritz was a Pinto gelding who could do and did do
anything and everything. He was the first Western film horse to be known and
credited by name. His popularity sometimes rivaled Hart,
receiving more fan mail than his owner Fritz retired after filming the movie
Singer Jim McKee in 1924, and lived happily in retirement with William Hart
until his passing. Fritz was laid to rest beneath this
monument after his death in 1938. Hart loved all his animals and gave them
special care. Nearby is a dog’s graveyard, we’re rest eleven of Hart’s dogs. Especially dear to him were his Great
Danes Gal and Prince. And as for William S Hart, we found his grave
in Brooklyn NY, at Greenwood Cemetery. We’re in northwestern Pennsylvania now,
at Hearthside Rest Pet Cemetery. This is where we find the final resting place of
a famous movie chimpanzee named Bonzo. If you saw our Viewers Special you’ll
recall our visit to Bonzo here, though a clarification needs to be made. There
were actually two chimps that portrayed Bonzo: the first was a female chimp named
Peggy, who starred alongside Ronald Reagan in 1951’s Bedtime for Bonzo.
Peggy died of suffocation during a zoo fire in Los Angeles in 1951, so for the
sequel, Bonzo Goes to College, in 1952, another chimp was cast as Bonzo. “I have something special for you today,
banana fritters. How does that strike you?’ This Bonzo would later
tour with the circus. It appears that this grave is that of the second Bonzo
of the chimp, who died in 1969 as the circus was passing through Pennsylvania. Where do the pets of celebrities go
when they die? To a pet cemetery of course. “Well sometimes, dead is better.” No, not Pet Sematary, pet
cemetery. There are a couple here in LA. We’re in Gardena, about 20 minutes south
of Hollywood, at Pet Haven Cemetery. It was founded in 1948 and is home to some
30,000 to beloved pets, including those of Hollywood stars from Groucho Marx to
Ava Gardner. Let’s see if we can find some of them. This is the westernmost section
along Figueroa. Here lies Mr. Pep, the dog, a
boxer, of the Nat King Cole family. Nat King Cole was one of the great jazz
vocalists and pianists of the 20th century, as well as the television star –
the first African-American man to host his own nationwide TV show. Cole is laid
to rest with his wife Maria, who was also a talented singer, in the Freedom
Mausoleum at Forest Lawn Glendale. Given the years it’s likely that Mr. Pep
was the childhood pet of singer Natalie Cole, who was born in 1950. Continuing south just past a tree are two dogs named Champ II and Cigar. These beloved puppies
belonged to the legendary Edward G Robinson. Fans of classic crime dramas
remember Robinson for his roles as gangsters and tough guys and films like
Little Caesar and Key Largo. Robinson died in 1973 and is entombed in a mausoleum
at Beth El Cemetery in Queens, NY. Just a few spaces away under a
tree we find quite a few of Jerry Lewis’s dogs. Jerry Lewis was one of film
and television’s kings of comedy. Early on he partnered with crooner Dean Martin as
Martin and Lewis, and went on to make hilarious comedies like The Nutty
Professor. He was also a dog lover and many of his beloved pooches rest here.
Let’s meet a few of them: here’s Pepe, Figaro, Chipper and Caesar, Skipper, Runty, Ladybug, JoJo, and Doodles. As for Lewis himself, he
was cremated after his death in 2017 at the age of 91. Back to the pathway
leading south past the statue, on the left, we find the pets of Bobby Troup and
Julie London. This is Kimmie, the pet of Bobby Troup. With some of the pets we’ll
visit today it’s unclear if they are a cat or a dog. Bobby Troup was a musician,
known for his hit, “Get Your Kicks on Route 66,” and an actor on the 70s show
Emergency. His co-star on the show was also his wife, Julie London, whose pet
Patsy rests here. And like her husband, Julie London was also a musician known
for her smoky vocals, in songs like “Cry Me a River.” We visited the resting
place of Bobby and Julie in our very first video, here in the courts of
remembrance at Forest Lawn Hollywood Hills. While there are certainly more pet
stars here, that’s all we find today. But we’ve got one more stop
before our tour is through. The largest and most popular pet cemetery in the LA area is the Los
Angeles Pet Memorial Park in Calabasas, about 30 minutes west of Hollywood. Like
Pet Haven, many of Hollywood’s biggest legends have laid their cherished
companions to rest here in tiny graves and miniature crypts.
We’ll also find a few more animal stars in these grounds. The cemetery was
founded in 1928 by celebrity veterinarian Dr. Eugene Jones, who bought
10 acres of land outside of the city to form the region’s first pet cemetery.
Here our dearly departed animals are watched over by the patron saint of
animals, Saint Francis of Assisi. Passing through the gates into the cemetery
you’ll see this monument to the Rainbow Bridge on the right. It tells of a bridge
connecting heaven and earth called the Rainbow Bridge. After a pet dies it
goes to a land of meadows and lush green grass just this side of the Rainbow
Bridge. There they play and wait for their special person to join them. After
we die we are reunited with our sweet pet, who has been waiting for us there.
Together we then crossed the Rainbow Bridge into heaven,
never again to be separated. We’ll begin our tour here left of the
entrance in a section known as Forever Yours. Earlier we visited a number of
famous cowboy horses, here we’ll find a few more, including this legendary equine,
Topper. He was the horse of TV’s most popular
cowboy in the 1950s Hopalong Cassidy. Topper would also team up with Hoppy in
his feature film so in 1939 on. And when Hopalong Cassidy made
appearances in parades and rodeos young fans were often just as excited to see
Topper as they were to see Hoppy. Hopalong Cassidy was played by William Boyd who
is laid to rest here with his wife Grace Bradley, an actress, in a sanctuary of
sacred promise in the Great Mausoleum of Forest Long Glendale. Topper died in 1961
at around 25 years old. Just to the right are a number of pets of
Chief Thundercloud. Here are Snooks and Sugar. Chief Thundercloud was a western film
actor known for being the first to portray Tonto, the lone Ranger’s Native
American companion, in the 1930s. Chief Thundercloud, whose real name was Victor
Daniels, continued to perform as a character actor in films and television
until his death from stomach cancer at age 56. He was laid to rest here in the
fuchsia terrace of the Great Mausoleum. Further right we find two of Chief
Thundercloud’s horses. This is Smoke. In the 1930s Chief Thundercloud lent out
smoke to western actor Dick Foran for his Warner Bros Westerns. Smoke would
make around 15 films as Dick Foran’s horse, and is remembered as a clever
horse who could perform unique tricks and stunts. And next to Smoke is another
of Chief Thundercloud’s horses, Sunny, who would play Tonto’s horse, Scout, in films
like The Lone Ranger Rides Again, and in other Western films through the
30s and 40s. A little further right we find a number
of Louie Dresser’s pets. Louise was an actress in the 20s and 30s known for
playing Empress Elizabeth in the Scarlet Empress, and her Oscar-nominated role in
A Ship Comes In. She also played Will Rogers wife in a number of films, like
State Fair. After her death in 1965 at age 86 Louise was entombed in the
sanctuary of meditation here in the Great Mausoleum.
She was a real animal lover. Let’s meet some of her pets who rest here: Wee Wong, Choggie, Kickan, Bubbie, a gallant little soldier, and Tagalong.
Happy landings, little ones. One of the biggest stars here was the
companion to one of Hollywood’s biggest stars. This is Kabar, Rudolph Valentino’s faithful dog. Young Kabar, a Doberman, was
given to Valentino on a trip to Europe in 1922. Valentino grew very fond of the
dog who would accompanied him just about everywhere, and even sleep in the same
room. For some reason though on Valentino’s last trip east in 1926 Kabar
did not accompany him. Valentino, silent film star of movies like The Sheik, would
not return, dying from complications after surgery for appendicitis
at the age of 31. It’s said that at the time of Valentino’s death, Kabar, who
was 3,000 miles away, let out mournful howls, and in the years following his
master’s death was known to wander for miles and search his lost friend. He died, many believe,
of a broken heart in 1929, at just six years old. Left of here
is a walkway, and left of that is Forget-Me-Not Corner. Here we find a few
pets of Bud Abbott, half of legendary comedy duo, Abbott and Costello, with Lou
Costello. Abbott was the straight-man in the duo, which began on radio in the late
30s, and had a number of successful films and a TV show. Their most popular skit was
“Who’s on first?” “Who’s on first, What’s on second,
I Don’t Know is on third.” “You know the guys’ names on
the baseball team?” – “Well go ahead, who’s on first?”
– “Yes” – “I mean the guy’s name.”
– “Who.” – “The guy playing first.”
– “Who.” – “The guy playing first base.”
– “Who.” “The guy on first base.” “Who is on first.” “Whaddaya asking me for? I don’t know!” Bud Abbott died in 1974 and was cremated. His pets who rest here are: Wakie, Tiny, and Bitsy. Up and to the right a few spaces
we find a dog named Pussy Cat. This little fellow belonged to funny man Morey
Amsterdam, whose sense of humor is certainly manifest in naming his dog
Pussy Cat. Morey is remembered for playing
Buddy on the Dick Van Dyke Show in the 1960s. He’s laid to rest in the courts of
remembrance at Forest Lawn Hollywood Hills. Continuing up and to the right we
find a cat named Pukie Barrymore, one of the lesser-known members of Hollywood’s
Barrymore dynasty. Pukie was the dear little cat of actor Lionel Barrymore, who
is known for his roles as Mr. Potter in It’s a Wonderful Life, and his
Oscar-winning performance in 1931’s A Free Soul. He was the great uncle of Drew
Barrymore, and after his death in 1954 at age 76 he was entombed at the mausoleum
in Calvary Cemetery. Let’s continue on up the hill to find Muggins, an Irish Setter
who belonged to Jimmy and Jeanie Durante. Jimmy Durante, lovingly known as the
schnozzola, was a singer, pianist, and actor known for his distinctive gravel
voice – one of the most popular personalities of the 20s through the 70s.
Durante lived to be 86 and rests at Holy Cross Cemetery in Los Angeles. Proceeding back to the south we find a
little fellow named Bubsie. Fans of big-band music will recognize the name
along the bottom. Harry James was a trumpet-playing bandleader in the 30s
and the 40s. It’s not clear which Mrs. Harry James shared the affections of
Bubsie with him, but given the dates, it may have been the one and only Betty
Grable. Up the hill just a little further we find Droopy, a wonderful little pup
who belonged to Lauren Bacall. Droopy was a cocker spaniel. The little pup died
young. Shortly thereafter she wed Humphrey Bogart and the two became co-parents of
a boxer named Harvey. Bacall was known for her love of her dogs throughout her
life. So fond was she in fact that she left millions to her last dog, Sophie, in
her will. After Lauren Bacall died in 2014 she was cremated, the location of
her ashes unknown. At the top of the hill surrounded by trees we find a pup named
Pete. If you’re a fan of the Our Gang or Little Rascals series you’ll remember
the beloved pooch with the ring around his eye.
The first Petey was played by a pitbull terrier named Pal the wonder dog. When
Pal died in 1930 by poisoning, he was replace by one of his offspring
named Pete. “Don’t worry Petey, I ain’t gonna eat you up.” This Petey had a circle drawn around his
left eye, whereas the original Petey’s ring, which was mostly natural, was around the
right. This Pete would perform in the Our Gang shorts until 1932, when a number of
other dogs would take over the role until the series ended. He lived to the
age of 16. Heading back toward the north we find one of the most exotic animals
in the park: an African lion named Tawny. Tawny is often touted by various sources
as being one of the MGM Lions, although it’s unclear in what capacity. If you’ve
seen an MGM movie you’ll certainly remember the opening logo with the lion,
first seen in 1924’s He Who Gets Slapped. According to MGM’s history of the logo,
the original lion was a Dublin born lion named Slats. In the decades that followed
there would be four additional official lions: Jackie, Tanner, George,
and the best-known, Leo the Lion. There would also be two unofficial
lions used for preliminary two-strip color tests, named Coffee and Telly. There
doesn’t seem to be any mention of a Tawny that fits the 1918 to 1940 timeframe.
Slats was reportedly buried on a farm in New Jersey, and the hide of one of the
MGM lions is on display at the McPherson Museum in Kansas, though they
admit they don’t know which lion it is. Now this is not to say that reports of
Tawny being an MGM lion are inaccurate. Lions in Hollywood were often hired out
for promotional events, parades, appearances, etc. Not to mention roles
in films and television. We just can’t say with any
certainty specifically what roles Tawny may have played. Back down the hill
toward the walkway we find another Valentino, this one the dog named Bunky.
It belonged to Jean Acker, the first wife of Rudolph Valentino. Though their
marriage only lasted a few hours, Jean would retain the name Valentino for the
rest of her life. She was an actress from the silent era into the 50s, though her
best claim to fame was always her marriage to Valentino. After her death in
1978 of age 84 she was laid to rest here at Holy Cross Cemetery next to her
partner, Chloe Carter. Let’s cross over to the
garden of eternal rest. This is a cat named Room 8, not a Hollywood star but
famous by local lore. He became the unofficial mascot of Elysian Heights
Elementary School after entering an open window of room eight. There he became an
annual fixture dubbed Room 8 by the children. He would disappear during the
summer but returned every year for 16 years on the first day of school.
His return would become an advent, with reporters and cameras waiting for his
return. He would become the most famous feline in America at that time, the
subject of documentaries and even a children’s book. I’ll post the full text
of this Elegy to Room 8 in the description so that you can read it. Let’s head over to loving memories section. Here we find Angel Spelling, the dog of
Tori Spelling, who famously played Donna on Beverly Hills 90210. Given the years
Angel would have been Tori’s childhood pet. Let’s make our way now up the hill
to the mausoleum. This miniature pet mausoleum
was built in 1929 and restored
in 2003 through the efforts of a nonprofit called SOPHIE. As Calabasas
grew and became prime real estate the cemetery became threatened by the
possibility of being sold to developers in the 1970s. SOPHIE, which stands for
Saving Our Pets History In Eternity, was formed and raised the money to buy and
save the cemetery, and subsequently lobbied for protective legislation,
permanently safeguarding the cemetery under California state law. We didn’t find any animal stars within
the mausoleum, but for our last stop we’ll follow this brick pathway near the
fountain to find a memorial to Adam Sandler’s first son, an English bulldog
named Meatball. He starred with Sandler in the 2002 short film A Day With the
Meatball, and he served as ring bearer at Sandler’s wedding in 2003. Meatball’s dad
played the talking pooch in Little Nicky. Days after Meatball’s untimely death of a
heart attack at age 4, Sandler would carry his collar down the red carpet
with him at the premiere of 50 First Dates. This Memorial brick was later placed
here in his honor. And that concludes our tour. Who are the animal stars in your sky? Let us know in the comments below, and be sure to like, share, and subscribe for
more famous grave tours. Thanks for watching! We’ll see you this side of the
Rainbow Bridge. One of the charming aspects of
strolling a pet cemetery is reading the unique and sometimes humorous names and epitaphs that people
give their pets. Oh man, Mrs. Santa Claus. Not Santa Claus too! “There goes Christmas.” Hey, I finally saw a ghost in a cemetery. My favorite cookie. Oh! Can’t argue with that!

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