Pyrography Techniques Cheetah Pyrography Tutorial wood burning techniques

Pyrography Techniques Cheetah Pyrography Tutorial wood burning techniques


Hi. Welcome to Pyrography Made Easy. I’m Brenda In this tutorial episode I’m going to explain how to create
the cheetah artwork that I did. The pattern and reference photo
that I used for this artwork is available on my Etsy page. and I’ll put a link to that in the description below Also in the video I will be using terms like circular motion and zigzag strokes if you are unfamiliar with my terminology I have a video that explains them and I’ll put a link to that in the description below too Well let’s get started. Start by burning in the trace lines
around the right eye make sure to burn the lines in the fur
growth direction the lines on the pattern are drawn in
the fur growth direction I am using a combination of single lines and zigzags to burn in the trace lines Use the razor edge of the shader to burn a thin dark line next to the outer edge of the eye. Then use the flat of the shader to burn a thick band of dark color next to that line Afterwards burn the dark areas around the eye Then apply a layer of color to the stripe that runs along the side of the nose. As you work make sure to keep the
edges of the stripe jagged this will create the pale hairs from the nose that stick out here and there. You might have noticed that I tend to re-burn over the dark
hairs to build up the color. Adding multiple layers of zigzags gives the fur a lot more tonal depth and realism. Burn along the right edge of the dark
streak that is along the nose Then burn a thick dark band of color next to the outer edge of the left eye. Burn the hairs along the bottom edge of the eyebrow Make sure to burn them very jaggedly. Afterwards burn in the cast shadow
from the eyebrow on to the eye Make sure to keep the upper edge jagged as that is creating the wispy eyebrow hairs Next burn along the sides of the eye to
darken them up a little The pupil is not visible on the reference photo but I decided to burn one in any way and I think it looks better that way. Also I decided to ignore the little white reflection to the right of the eye. Now burn in the shadows on the right eye This eye is mostly in shadows. The shadows on both eyes have jagged lower edges due to the eyebrow hairs. Resume burning in the trace lines. Be mindful of the fur length The fur on the nose and the cheeks below the eyes is much shorter than the fur on top of
the head so as you work adjust the length of your burn stroke accordingly. On the nose use a much shorter zigzag stroke stroke compared to what you would use on
the top of the head. Angle the board as needed to make burning comfortable I rotated the board diagonally when I put the image onto the board I also burned a wide dark border around the edges of the board. I thought that this frames the artwork very nicely and gives it a polished look. Todd cut a piece of plywood to hold the board in place while I was burning on it and that worked very well. I am burning on a piece of artists cradle board. Cradle boards are nothing more than a piece of plywood panel with a wooden support I do not know the particular brand that I am using right now as this is part of my final round of testing cradle boards. Cradle boards are buffered somehow so the artwork doesn’t fade near us badly
as regular plywood does. I do like the fact that you can darken the sides of the boards and give it a very professional framed
finished look to the artwork Also you can order cradle boards in a wide variety of sizes but what I dislike is the texture. All plywood has small slivers of missing wood The missing wood shows up as thin pale lines on areas that are darkly burned Some boards are worse than others but every single piece of plywood I have
ever burned on has this issue I still burn on plywood even though I
dislike its texture Plywood tends to be cheaper than solid wood boards and it’s easier to get it in larger sizes. I am using a card embossing tool to create an embossed line or embedded groove into the surface of the wood. To deepen the groove I scrape over it with the point of a sharp knife. Then I use a kneadable eraser pinched into a thin wedge to erase the graphite that got pushed
to the bottom of the groove I am undecided if this process to create whiskers was worthwhile I say this because once I was done burning I used the sharp point of a knife to recreate the whiskers as
I had burned over them. You can try the method for yourself
yourself and see what you think It is best to use the flat of the shader when you burn over the embedded whiskers This will help prevent the pen tip from
getting down into the bottom of the groove and darkening up the wood. Finish burning over the trace lines making sure to burn them in the fur
growth direction There isn’t anything difficult about
this process The goal is to get the lines burned in so that the pencil marks can be erased. We want the pencil marks gone so that we don’t have to worry about them
smearing or being accidentally removed from
your hand rubbing over them. After the trace lines have been burned in then rub over the board with a pencil eraser to remove any residual graphite. I did not get that step on video but don’t forget to do that. Start by reburning along the right
edge of the face to darken it up. Also burn some dark long lines to create the wispy hairs that are sticking out Start the stroke on the face and pull the pen tip out and away from the face Then re-burn over the small area to the
right of the eye to darken it up Afterwards fine-tune the wispy hairs that
hang down over the eye and fine-tune the dark areas around the eye. Lastly burn over the rest of the eye to give it color. I am using circular motion for this and it will take a couple of times of
reburning over the area to build up the color and depth. Now apply a layer of a zigzags
to the face below the eye This area isn’t very dark so it won’t require many layers of zigzags. But I do highly recommend that you burn the area darker than the reference photo is showing for two reasons One. It will help a fur and out against the background This is especially important if you will be
leaving the background unburned like I am Secondly, you won’t notice the fading as much. All pyrography on wood fades a bit over time Well actually the wood is aging and as the wood ages it turns colors When this happens you lose contrast and the light tan colors are not as noticeable. Make sure to re-burn over the dark stripe along the side of the nose. and add a few dark wispy hairs along the edge of the face. Now burn in the fur on the bridge of the nose to the left of the eye. Make sure to burn the zigzags in
the fur growth direction This area is a transition zone so it has some direction changes. It can be helpful to rotate the board as you work so you can easily burn zigzags in the fur growth direction Afterwards darken up the markings on the right side of the forehead Don’t worry about burning the fur
to its final color right now. Our current goal is to block in the fur and start giving the face shape . We will end up applying several layers of
zig zags to build up the tonal depth the overall color and provide the shape to the face Let’s resume working on the fur along the top of the nose Burn in the darker areas first I use the darker areas to help me locate where I’m at in
comparison with the reference photo Also these areas are often the key spots
that help give the face shape so you don’t want to lose them. As you work remember that the fur along the nose is some of the shortest in length Make sure to burn very short zigzags
along this area. If you want to create realistic artwork it is very important to consult with
the reference photo often. I removed the numerous pauses from
the video where I have stopped burning because I am checking with the reference photo. I realized that the dark stripes that run along the sides of the nose were not dark enough so I’m reburning over them to fix that. Let’s work on the left eye some more. Darken up the right corner by the eye Then re-burn along the
wispy hairs that hang over the eye Afterwards darken up the upper half of the eye It is in shadows so it should be burned to
a dark brown to black color Then burn over the lower half of the
eye to give it color The center of the lower half is the palest area on the eye Darken up the vertical markings above the eye. With the left one I am burning v-shaped zigzags Then resume burning in the fur along the top of the nose The area near the bridge of the nose or between the eyes has several fur growth direction changes But keep in mind as long as you are fairly
close no one is going to notice The fur in this area is lighter in color
than the rest of the nose fur . To help ensure that it remains paler Increase the gap or the distance between the lines in each zigzag burst Also don’t burn as many layers of zigzags in this area. Darken up the nose Use the shader of your choice and the burn stroke of your preference. The area of reflected light
along the top or tip of the nose should be a medium brown color The rest of the nose should be a very dark brown to black color. Make sure your pen tip is an optimal position when burning along the outer edges of the nose. Switch to a medium ball pen tip or a writer pen tip and apply a layer of dark tiny dots
over the entire area of reflected light on the nose. Darken up the right side of the
fur along the nose that is circled in green on the reference photo. The color is darkest near the nose Plus there is a cast shadow to the right of the nose Use zig zags when darkening up the fur. Each layer of zig zags helps create the depth and realism of the fur. The reason is that you are very unlikely to burn over the exact same burn strokes
from the previous layer or layers so this means that there will be
areas of overlapping color and gaps were the underlying layers show through It might be helpful to rotate the board as you burn in the fur on the left side of the face This fur isn’t very dark and there are both subtle and bold markings. Plus there is a white band of fur next to the eye. Below that is a dark tan marking. Burn some light to medium brown short lines or dashes on the first part of the eyebrow. For really short lines just tap the pen tip on the area. Burn in the fur on the right eyebrow. With the white fur just burn in a few random short lines or
dashes that are tan in color. Afterwards re-burn over the markings in
the area to darken them up Be mindful of the thin strip of fur that is between the two dark
markings on the far right Darken up the markings on the brow. Then burn in the fur using the razor edge of the shader to burn zigzag bursts A reminder that you need to use a light hand pressure when burning zig zags A heavy hand pressure will force the edge of the pen tip down into the wood this will make it difficult to make the slight
direction changes that zigzags require Plus additional layers of zig zags will be harder to apply. An essential aspect to my zigzag fur creation method is variety. So you must vary where you start them Vary the size, length, and width of each zigzag burst. Add another layer of zigzags to the fur on
the bridge of the nose to darken it up. Make sure your strokes are burned in the fur growth direction. Now burn in the fur above the left eye. Make sure to leave the white patch just above the eye unburned or very pale in color at this time. Burn in the lower eyelid to a dark
brown or black color Leave a really thin line for the reflected
light found in the area Next use the razor edge of the shader to burn short lines along the
bottom edge of the eyelid Then darken up the inner corner of the eye Now burn in the lips to a dark brown or black color Make sure to create a jagged upper edge to mimic the wispy white hairs of the muzzle. Then burn in the dark shadow
right under the jaw. Again create a jagged line along the edge of the jaw After that start working on the body fur Burn in the markings to a dark brown
or black color Remember to use the razor edge of the
shader when creating fur texture this will mimic the look of thin hairs. With the exception of the cast shadow to the right of the face I use zig zags to create the dark markings I used uniform strokes on the shadow. If you look closely at the markings you will see that they have slightly jagged edges. Zig zags are great for creating uneven edges. I want to point out that I am reburning over markings as I encounter them. When I do encounter a marking I do not adjust the heat setting on my burner. Instead I slow down my hand speed and I burn the zigzag lines very close
together In fact I would say that I have eliminated
almost all of the gap between the lines In this pulled back view you can see how the board is sitting
in the cut out plywood It works great. I don’t have to worry about the board shifting positions as I burn I find it beneficial to work on
sections at a time So I am burning in the fur between the jaw and where the
fur direction changes Breaking down the subject into smaller parts makes it less intimidating to work on. Plus I don’t have to worry as much
about fur direction changes Darken up the stripe that is to
the left of the muzzle. Then, if needed, re-burn over the small dot
that is near the nose Next burn in the tan fur on the muzzle. In this area I used a combination
of zig zags and single lines Concentrate the color or burn marks along
the bottom of each row of whiskers This will help give shape to the area. To me a row is defined by the subtly
shadowed horizontal lines that arch slightly across the muzzle Green arrows are pointing to a few of the
lines that I am talking about. Now burn some tan lines on the white chin fur to give it shape and some texture. Concentrate the lines along the top and bottom of the chin. Then work your way up the right side of the muzzle If needed reburning areas like the cast
shadow to darken them up. I think that all white fur should have an assortment
of tan lines burned in it to create the look of fur. Otherwise it will look like an area
on the board that wasn’t burned in. Apply another layer of zigzags over the
fur on the nose. Make sure to build up the darker areas as they are what gives shape to the face. Yes, my method of creating fur requires a
lot of reburning but then let’s be honest most of the artwork I create does require
a lot of reburning so this shouldn’t be a surprise to anyone Fine-tune the fur to the left of the eye. The fur is tan in color and there is a thin white band of fur next to the eye Afterwards burn in the fur just above the
white part of the eyebrow. Also darken up the fur along the top of the cheek. If needed re-burn a few of the
darker markings in the area Then evaluate the eyes and decide if
they need more work. I felt that both of mine needed to be
darkened up a bit more Especially the left one. With the left eye I added several long vertical lines to represent the shadows
from the eyebrow hairs Touch up the fur around the eye. If needed darken up the tan marking
under the eye. Don’t burn this marking too dark. It is darker than the fur on the cheek but it is also much lighter in color than
the dark markings nearby. Time to re-burn over the nose. I am mostly using circular motion along the bottom of the highlighted area
on the nose. This is to give it some gradient shading. Currently my nose has a clearly defined nostril opening and that is not on the reference photo Along the top of the nose where the
black skin ends and the fur begins I am burning dark zigzags and single lines to create the transition between those two areas Let’s resume working on the top of the head. Like before use zig zags to burn
and re-burn over areas. Darken up markings as you encounter them and make sure to keep their edges jagged. Also the fur on top of the head is longer
than what is found on the nose This means you should increase the
length of your burn strokes a little. Let’s recap the basic principles of burning zig zags. Use the razor edge of the shader Vary where you start each a zigzag burst Vary the width and length of each zigzag burst Vary the gap between the lines in the zigzag burst Use the same zigzag burn stroke
when reburning over areas Use a light hand pressure and one of the most important things is to always burn in the fur growth direction. I find it helpful to compare and
work small sections at a time Then I compare that area with the artwork as a whole When I do this I am looking at the overall
darkness of the area I am working in compared to the rest of the artwork. For example when working on the
side of the face concentrate on a small area like the fur under the eye. After you are done burning in the fur make sure the color is appropriate in relationship to the rest of the face. The fur under the eye should not be darker than the color you
are burning on top of the head or along the top of the nose If the fur under the eye is darker Then you need to either lighten up that fur or darken up the other areas. Take your time with your artwork You get out of it what you put into it. Look at the photo in the upper left corner. Some of you might think it looks pretty good and doesn’t need more work other
than to finish the ears Now compare that with the picture below it. I took the time to apply more layers of fur. Doing this added a number of hours to the project but the results are worth it. I ended up with smoother transitions between areas and nicer overall color. I want to point out that you need to burn in the background
behind the white fur on the neck otherwise it won’t stand out. It is important to keep the edges of the fur jagged to replicate the numerous hairs
that stick out here and there Stray hairs that stick out are also the reason that the
dark spots should have jagged edges My cheetahs chin needs some work It’s too large and square-shaped. Plus there are several long thick hairs or
whiskers that stick out here and there that mine is lacking. As I re-burn over the area I am burning in single lines I need a lot more precision than what I
could get using zig zags In addition to fixing the shape of the chin I am also adding more tan lines in the fur Plus I’m darkening up the shadows along the sides. I did not end up with an exact replica
of the reference photo but that’s okay. It’s fairly close and no one
is really going to notice. Let’s resume working on the body. There isn’t anything out of the ordinary
with the upper portion of it. Just apply a layer of zig zags in the Fur growth direction Be aware that the fur gets lighter in color near the throat so increase the gap between the lines in
your zigzag burst Burn the dark markings to a dark brown or black color and make sure to keep the edges
jagged or unsmooth. Keep in mind that you do not
have to replicate the exact shape and location of each
marking that is on the reference photo. you can increase or decrease the number of markings You can alter their shapes as long as your cheetah has some dark spots on it the rest really doesn’t matter. With the throat there is a direction change because
of the head being turned This creates a line where the skin folds. The fur adjacent to the body fur has a slight grayish tan hue to it and the markings are more subdued in color on the throat. Take your time while burning in the area I am still using zig zags and single lines for this but the color is so light that it is hard to tell. It is better to burn lightly in new areas to ensure you’re getting the shadows
and markings in their proper spots. Light colored burns are easier to fix and it’s very easy to re-burn over them to
darken them up once you know they’re good. I mentioned before that the background
behind the neck needs to be darkened up so that the white fur will stand out. I am burning zig zags next to the edge of the fur. This darkens the background and creates the numerous hairs that
stick out in the area. If needed darken up the shadowed
area near the lower jaw. Periodically it is a good idea to critically
look at your artwork and do any fine-tuning as needed. I often find small areas that need to be
darkened up a little bit. Burn in the dark areas on the left
side of the muzzle I am tapping the pen tip in the area to create the roundish spots shown on the reference photo I am also using the razor edge of the shader to burn short thin dark lines along the spots. On this area of the body the color is starting to fade as
it nears the white belly fur. The only thing to be aware of besides the color fading is that the fur changes direction. Right along the belly fur the fur is almost vertical in direction instead of the horizontal angle that the
majority of the body fur is. Other than those two items this is a very straight forward area to work in Apply a layer of zigzags in the fur growth direction and darken up the spots as you encounter them. I said before that it is a good idea to
periodically analyze your artwork. When I do this I will often see areas that
need to be darkened so I spend a little time reburning over them to fix them up I do realize that the less experience you have the harder this is to do but I promise that with each project you do, it will get easier. It just takes time to train your eyes to see
the small details and numerous shadows that you need to replicate to create realistic artwork I’m sorry the video is slightly blurry I had the camera zoomed in too far Burn really short zigzags or short lines
along the outer edge of the ear. Then darken up along the base of the ear making sure to create jagged edges on
both sides of your burn area Afterwards start burning in the darker fur on the lower right corner of the ear I am using a combination of burning single lines and tapping the pen tip along the area. With the video being in focus you can see how I’m burning really
short lines as I darken up the fur. The lines need to be short close to the
edge of the ear but they should increase in length as
you move away from the edge. Also the line should start curving. Burn along the edge of the curving fur
where the color fades to white Then burn in the short tan fur near the
edge of the ear Afterwards finish burning the short dark fur along the outer edge of the ear. I am using the razor edge of the shader and just tapping the pen tip to the area. I want to point out that I am NOT trying to replicate every
wispy hair in this dark area of the ear. Instead I am just creating the general
impression of wispy hairs. The hairs are created by burning small
zigzag bursts and short lines here and there. Make sure to leave apps in between
the burn strokes The pale gaps become the wispy hairs. I think it is important to take breaks from working on areas
that are a bit complex or complicated When I take breaks I often work on
darkening up sections of fur that don’t require much concentration. With the dark opening of the ear work slow and don’t worry about trying to replicate
the reference photo exactly. Create a few wispy hairs and then re-burn around them to
darken up the area behind them Keep in mind that it might be helpful to draw the wispy
hairs in with a white charcoal pencil and then burn around the white charcoal
lines Just make sure to erase them when they
are no longer needed. Now I cannot emphasize enough the need
to slow down and take your time I cut out the numerous times I am pausing as I consider what I’ve just burned and how I want to proceed. Plus I consult with the reference photo
often and so should you. The reference photo tells or shows where
you need to put the light and dark areas The ear opening is very dark but only in
a few places so the artwork should match that but the wispy hairs in those areas do not
need to be exactly replicated. Along the right side of the ear the fur starts out as a rich deep tan color but it fades to white next to the dark opening. Again the artwork should mimic this but the artwork does not need to be an exact replica. as I create the wispy hairs I am still using a zig zag burn stroke but I leave gaps between each zig zag burst. Plus I increase the distance between the
lines on each zig zag Also I change the direction that I’m
burning the zig zags in. The goal is to create a lot of lines burned in several different directions. After I have burned in some zig zags I look at the area and start picking out
individual hair shapes I burn around that shape to give it better definition and help it stand out. I will repeat this process a number of times but each time I do, I burn fewer zigzags and spend more time creating individual
wispy hairs and darkening up the area around those hairs. The right ear is less complicated than
the left. Think of the right ear in terms of rows
or bands of color Each row needs jagged edges on both sides of it As you burn in each row make sure to burn the
zigzags in the fur growth direction The green arrow is pointing to a spot or
line where the fur changes direction To the right of that arrow the fur is angled towards the right. To the left of the green arrow The fur is angled in the opposite direction so it’s angled towards the left. I do want to mention that I am burning the outer edge of the ear much darker than the reference photo shows The reason is that I will not be burning in
the background in this area The dark edge on the ear will help it
stand out from the background If you plan to burn in the background then you might not need to burn darkly
along the outer edge of the ear. I’ve mentioned before that the realistic fur I create is accomplished by burning a number of zigzag layers. Each layer darkens the overall color and adds more tonal depth or variety to the artwork. I generally apply five to eight layers of
zig zags to create the fur. There is an exception to that in areas that need to stay light or pale in
color I only apply one to three layers White areas of fur like those under the
eyes are spots where I would burn fewer
layers of zig zags Back to the body Finish applying a layer of zig zags over
the darker colored fur in the area. Burn in the dark spots as you encountered them. Now hopefully you do know you can burn in all of the spots and then work on the rest of the fur. Depending on the direction you
need to burn the zigzags It might be helpful to rotate the board. I have mentioned before that I am burning on a cradle board. This is nothing more than a piece of
plywood with a wooden support. The thick sides that you see in the video
are the support boards and I’m pretty sure that they’re made out of pine I like to darken up the sides of the cradle board I think it gives it a very nice look I use thinned down black acrylic paint for
this as I dislike burning on pine it has oozed resin on me a number of
times so now I don’t burn over pine. As an FYI Todd is able to apply a sealant over the
paint without any problems. Continue to burn in the fur using the
zigzag burn stroke. Darken up the spots as you encounter them the spots should be dark
brown to black in color. Since I put the cheetah on the diagonal of the board most of the lower body is not visible As you can see in the large photo
in the left corner the cheetahs leg is bent this makes it handy as the fur is pretty much all growing in the same horizontal direction. The exception is along the top
edge of the leg where some of the wispy hairs are sticking out vertically. Also the upper edge of the white fur on
the chest has some vertical hairs This cradle board has a two inch or 3.1 centimetre support frame around it when working along the edges I don’t have anything to rest my hand on so notice how I place my pinky finger on
the edge of the board to support my hand This steadies your hand making it easier to burn. I have been working my way
steadily towards the bent leg. The closer I get the more I am angling
the fur to a vertical direction Although I really doubt most people will
ever pay that much attention to this minor detail It is up to you on how complex you
want to make this You can simplify the body burn it all in the same direction and let the color fade along the white
chest and neck area Or you can do as I have done and add the slight direction changes to
indicate the presence of the leg. Either way will produce fantastic results. As I am getting closer to the
bottom of the board it is getting difficult to work as I don’t have
anything to support my hand on but a quick board rotation fix that problem. Since everything has a base layer of fur it is time to add more layers of zigzags to darken up the fur and give it
a richer tonal depth. Adding layers of zigzags should be done in the same way as the
initial layer was done so you should vary where you start each zigzag burst You should vary how many lines are
in each zig zag Vary the gap between the lines in each zig zag Burn the zig zags in the fur growth direction. Shorten the height of the zig zags when
working on really short fur like the facial fur on the nose and
cheek of the cheetah. The white fur on the neck needs some texture because right now it looks like unburned wood to me so burn some zig zags but make sure
to leave gaps between them. The green arrow is pointing to the skin
fold on the neck the fur is longer there I burned a number of long single lines
to replicate that The burn strokes need to stay in the tan range. Keep them on the lighter
side of the tan range I often fine-tune an area like the neck to build up the details and then I add another layer of zigzags to
the darker fur on the cheetah like I said before I normally apply four
to eight layers of zigzags I do realize that this method of fur
creation is not for everyone but it is a method that works well for me. Let’s fine-tune the right ear. Mostly I am darkening it up to make sure that it stands out from the background. I am also working on giving the wispy
hairs next to the dark ear opening more definition This is done by picking a hair and burning the area around it. Take your time I am pausing frequently as I evaluate my work I consult with the reference photo often and compare it with my artwork. I’m looking to see if I have gotten the dark areas in the
general location where they should be I am NOT concerned about replicating
each and every hair. Instead I just want the overall look of the
ear to be similar to the reference photo. Keep in mind that I am deliberately
making the ear darker on my artwork so that it will stand out from the background Darken up the black skin under the left eye. If needed use a writer pen tip to do this. Afterwards use a sharp knife tip to
scrape in a highlight Now let’s finish up the left ear Like the right ear do not worry about replicating
each and every hair Instead aim for the general impression of
the reference photo. No one is going to critically analyze the ear as long as it has an ear shape a dark opening and some wispy hairs the viewer will be very impressed with
what you have created Again take your time you’ve put a lot of work into this art rushing to get the job done as quickly as possible doesn’t win awards or produce amazing results If needed add a little more texture to
the white fur under the nose Keep the burn strokes in the light to
medium tan range. Concentrate the color along the lines
where the whiskers emerge the very last thing we need to do is restore the white whiskers. Use the sharp point of a knife and scrape along the lines to remove any discoloration. Or if you didn’t create them before do so now by scraping away the color to create
whiskers. Well that’s it for this tutorial I hope that you enjoyed it. On my website: Pyrography Made Easy I have the written version of the tutorial but as I said before the pattern and the reference photo
are for sell on my Etsy page. Well thank you so much for watching my video and I will see you next week

9 Comments on “Pyrography Techniques Cheetah Pyrography Tutorial wood burning techniques”

  1. Hola Brenda…como admiro tu arte y agradeciendo los tips para mejorar los trabajos…un gran saludo 🌹para ti

  2. Love this tutorial! Just wondering….1) what type of plywood are you burning on? I’ve only burnt on birch and having a hard time getting a dark consistent burn 2) when you’re burning over your previous burns, are you increasing your burning temp?

  3. Hello. I hope that you'll enjoy this tutorial. I want to mention that I am burning on a Cradle Board or a Wood Panel. It is nothing more than artist grade plywood. It doesn't fade as quickly or as badly as plywood does, but it also costs a lot more money than a sheet of plywood.
    I wrote a blog comparing 7 or 8 different brands of cradle boards: https://wp.me/p8j0lZ-3qj

    The cheetah is part of my final round of testing. This board I only know as board #7. While I don't know who manufactured the board, I can tell you I really dislike the board and don't recommend the brand. You can look up who the manufacturer is by looking up board #7 on the blog.
    PLEASE DO NOT TELL ME WHO THE MANUFACTURER IS! I'm trying to remain completely unbiased for my final round of testing and I still have 4 or 5 more boards to burn something onto. I can remember from the initial round of testing that were a couple of brands I really hated, so knowing the brand would ruin my attempts to be unbiased.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *